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A simple guide to the main components and maintenance of a generator – Part 4: Generator maintenance

A simple guide to the main components and maintenance of a generator – Part 4: Generator maintenance
In the last part of our series on the key parts of a generator, we’re going to look at what maintenance is required to keep your generator online.
In the last part of our series on the key parts of a generator, we’re going to look at what maintenance is required to keep your generator online.

Maintenance
“Correct maintenance will help ensure a generator’s lengthy life span.  The best practice is to follow the guidelines set out by generator suppliers. 

“Daily checks should include a routine inspection and checking of the coolant heater, coolant level, oil level, fuel level, and charge-air piping. 

“Weekly tasks should include draining the fuel filter and draining water from the fuel tank, whilst the drive belt tension and the starting batteries should be checked monthly by the operators. 

“Items that should be checked every six months by trained critical power engineers include checking and cleaning the air cleaner, the battery charger and coolant concentration. Engineers should also take care to drain any exhaust condensate, clean the crankcase breather and check the radiator hoses that are connected to the generator.

“Engineers should also change the oil and filter, change the coolant filter, change the air cleaner element and fuel filters, and clean the entire cooling system depending on hours run or elapsed time. 
“In addition to the daily, weekly, monthly and six-month maintenance, the following annual checks should be carried out by the engineer:

• Visually and mechanically check all terminations and connections to ensure they are tightened correctly 
• Look for signs of poor connections, e.g. discoloured terminals / wiring of the connections 
• Check all other connections, welds, gaskets and joints 
• Check all guards are and covers are correctly fitted 
• Check areas in and around the generator for foreign objects and remove if necessary 
• With engine running, visually inspect the exhaust for leaks and heat damage to surrounding areas

“Whilst the generator is running, we also recommend that operators should carry out tests to check for misfires, excessive vibration, excessive exhaust smoke, any loss of power (where a load bank is available), monitor oil and coolant temperature, and to look and listen generally for any changes. 

“After running the generator, the operator should finally check if there has been any increase in oil or fuel consumption, as this might indicate an issue that needs to be remedied.”

Author: Petya Asgarova

13/07/2015 09:30:00
Listed in : Key parts of a generator  
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